Pimalai Sets Out 10-Year Plan To Make Koh Lanta A World-Leading Ecotourism Destination

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Ever since it opened 20 years ago, Pimalai Resort & Spa has worked tirelessly to protect the pristine ecosystems in and around Koh Lanta. Now, this natural five-star retreat is embarking on the next exciting phase of its environmental mission that will establish this stunning southern Thai island as a world-leading ecotourism destination.

Koh Lanta and the surrounding Mu Ko Lanta National Park, which covers 39 percent of the district, is a pure and peaceful corner of Thailand that is easily accessible – just a five-minute boat ride from the mainland – but feels a lifetime away from the country’s busy tourist resorts. Comprising four idyllic island groups and home to only around 30,000 residents, this enchanting area has developed at its own leisurely pace. When international borders reopen, visitors will be able to see Koh Lanta in all its glory following the annual six-month closure of the national park, which runs from May to October to help revive and replenish marine life.

Nestled in 100 acres of tropical jungle on the main island, cascading gently down to a 900-metre stretch of white sand, Pimalai is a haven of tranquility. The resort’s connection with the Earth is ingrained in its very existence; when founder Khun Anurat Tiyaphorn developed the resort, he took every possible step not to disturb the native flora and fauna; channelling rainwater from the mountains, retaining trees and dividing the project into phases to ensure that each area had time to recover.

Ever since it opened 20 years ago, Pimalai Resort & Spa has worked tirelessly to protect the pristine ecosystems in and around Koh Lanta. Now, this natural five-star retreat is embarking on the next exciting phase of its environmental mission that will establish this stunning southern Thai island as a world-leading ecotourism destination.

Koh Lanta and the surrounding Mu Ko Lanta National Park, which covers 39 percent of the district, is a pure and peaceful corner of Thailand that is easily accessible – just a five-minute boat ride from the mainland – but feels a lifetime away from the country’s busy tourist resorts. Comprising four idyllic island groups and home to only around 30,000 residents, this enchanting area has developed at its own leisurely pace. When international borders reopen, visitors will be able to see Koh Lanta in all its glory following the annual six-month closure of the national park, which runs from May to October to help revive and replenish marine life.

Nestled in 100 acres of tropical jungle on the main island, cascading gently down to a 900-metre stretch of white sand, Pimalai is a haven of tranquility. The resort’s connection with the Earth is ingrained in its very existence; when founder Khun Anurat Tiyaphorn developed the resort, he took every possible step not to disturb the native flora and fauna; channelling rainwater from the mountains, retaining trees and dividing the project into phases to ensure that each area had time to recover.

“Ever since our resort was founded, we have pledged to work in harmony with the entire island. Tourism needs to be sustainable; we cannot simply take away from our natural resources without giving anything back in return. We need form part of a circular economy that reduces our reliance on the planet and instead creates benefits for the whole of society. At Pimalai, we are proud to drive change in this direction. Our new 10-year targets will help us to establish Koh Lanta as a world-leading destination for responsible tourism and a beacon of hope for other communities, as we strive to create a better world,” said Charintip Tiyaphorn, the representative of Pimalai’s owner.

For guests, the results of Pimalai’s strategy are already clear to see; fresh white sand, crystal clear seas, native plants such as banyan trees, coconut palms, cashew nuts, jasmine, bird of paradise flowers, and even century-old, 80-metre-tall ton yang trees, and wildlife such as monitor lizards, eagles, hornbills and even dolphins. But the resort’s commitment runs much deeper than what can be seen with the naked eye; Pimalai is working hand-in-hand with schools, educating the next generation, and even enabling employment opportunities for students, including three- to six-month internships.

By engaging with local people, and especially with youngsters, Pimalai is striving to create a brighter future for the whole of Koh Lanta.

Pimalai has produced a short documentary capturing the places, personalities and organisations that are putting Koh Lanta’s sustainability credentials in the spotlight. Watch it now on Facebook and Instagram.

To learn more about Pimalai’s green targets, please visit pimalai.com/being-green. Or to book your stay at this natural five-star resort, please email reservation@pimalai.com or call 02 320 5500.