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Thursday, February 22, 2024

Sailors Thrive in Champagne Racing at Phuket King’s Cup Regatta

Blue skies, warm water and nice breeze greeted sailors today as they gathered off of Cape Promthep to compete in the second day of sailing at the prestigious 35th Phuket King’s Cup Regatta.

The International Dinghy Classes finished their three-day competition at Kata Beach. The event was divided into four classes as follows: Monohull Dinghy Handicap (12 boats); ILCA 4 (15 boats); Open Skiff (17 boats); and Optimist (79 boats).

The overall Optimist winner was Patcharaphan Ongkaloy, continuing on her gold-medal performance from the Southeast Asian Games. Pailin Jaroenpon was second followed by Karit Phrammanee, all Thais.

The Open Skiff class was won by India’s Anandi Chandavarkar – no surprise as she won the class each day. UWC’s Dom Kaewpradab of Thailand placed second each day capturing that position and India’s Ayaan Nath was third.

The ILCA4 class was swept by Thailand with Nanvatorn Supaamphonwit capturing top spot each day, Ton Rattana finisging second overall and Thanaphat Sirichaoren placing third.

The Monohull Dinghy Class (Handicap) was won by Claudia Nazarov with Voravong Racharattanaruk coming in second and Morten Jakobsen in third. Interesting shift for Jakobsen who last year sailed Hanuman XXXIX in the IRC 1 class. Claudia is the daughter of famed naval architect Albert Nazarov, himself an ILCA 4 sailor.

Race Officer Simon James sent the IRC Zero, IRC One & Multihull Racing classes on a windward-leeward for the first race today of the big boats followed by a coastal race (course 12). The Premier class raced course 8 (27 miles) while the Bareboat Charter, Mono-and-Multihull Cruising classes all sailed course 12 (18 miles).

Kevin Whitcraft’s TP52 THA72 did not race in the four-boat IRC Zero class today as it was beset by a technical problem defect as it headed for the start line. The day belonged to James & Kate Murray’s Callisto, a Pac 52, which won both races in this class. Ray Roberts TP52 Team Hollywood had two second-place showings today after winning all three races yesterday. Steve McConaghy’s Aftershock, a Davidson 55, took third today in both races.

Evey year, the regatta attracts sailing greats from around the world, and this year is no different. Adam Minoprio is back and behind the wheel for Team Hollywood. His list of sailing accomplishments are long and legendary including being the youngest winner of the New Zealand Optimist Nationals at age 11 in 1997. In 2009, he displaced James Spithill as the youngest World Match racing Tour Champion beating Sir Ben Ainslie in the finals. He competed in two Volvo Ocean Races; in 2011–12 on Camper Lifelovers and in 2014–15 on Team Brunel. He also sailed SAP Extreme Sailing Team in the Extreme Sailing Series winning the 2017 series championship. And he sailed for Groupama Team France during the 2015–16 America’s Cup World Series, helming their second boat at the 2017 America’s Cup. A very tough resume to match. Great to have him back and racing in the King’s Cup.

The five-boat Premier class saw the Thai vessel Pine Pacific, an X-Yacht 55, skipped by Ithinai Yingsiri, win the only race in its class today, its third straight victory. Peter Cremers’ Shatoosh, a Warwick 75, was second for the third straight race. Bernard Huybens’ Aphrodite, a Vitters 92, was third today as Hans Rahmann’s JV 72 custom-built Yasooda started but could not finish. Viroj Nualkair’s MaDuZi did not sail again as it is acted as the committee boat for the last day of the dinghy races.

Nick Burns’ Witchcraft, a Millenium 40, won both races today in the seven-boat IRC One class claiming four of the five races held in this class so far. Rolf Heemskerk’s The Next Factor, a Farr 40 (Mod), was second in the class with a third and second-place finish today.

Susurnu Kurose’s Cha Chan, a First 40.7, was third on the day followed by Craig Douglas/Gordon Kettleby’s Ramrod, a Farr 40. Craig Nichols Alright, a Sydney 40, finished fifth. Robert Carr & Sandy Farquharson’s Aquarii, a Sydney 40, was sixth. Clayton Craigie’s Anjo, a Beneteau First 40, was unable to finish the first race of the day (fourth overall in the series) and couldn’t start the second race (fifth in the series).

The six-boat Bareboat Charter Class saw Dean Peng’s Dragonborn, a Beneteau First 40.7, win today giving two out of three first-place finishes. Mike Downard’s Piccolo, a Farr 1104, was second while Hippocrates, a Yamaha 34s, skipped by Toshihiko Iljima, was in third spot.

Alan Anderson’s Judy, a Farr 30 was in fourth place in this class with Moonshine, a Oceanis 45, featuring the ASA Sailing Dream Asia in fifth. Team Hayato, on a Sun Odyssey 409, rounded out the class.

The five-boat Monohull Cruising class saw Jianhao Yang’s Isabella, a Bavaria 46C, continue its winning streak. Steve Maine’ Enavigo, a Grand Soleil 45 was in second spot with Philippe Dallee’s Swan II, a Swan 43 (1969) placing third. Thomas Veltin’s Brisk, an RG 6.5 Classe Mini, was fourth, and Mo Yiwei’s Sumalee, a Sun Odyssey 409, was fifth today.

The two-boat Multihull Racing class flipflopped placings as Dan Fidock’s Kata Rocks 1 aka Parabellum, an Extreme 40, won the second race and John Newnham’s Kata Rocks 2 aka Twin Sharks, a Firefly 750 Sportboat, the first. The sleek Parabellum again took overall line honours in the both races today.

Andrew McDermott’s Corsair 28 Trident dismasted during the practice race, but the trimaran was repaired yesterday and they were back in the water today beating the only other competitor in the Multihull Cruising class, Frank Kastelein’s Team No Escape, a Leopard 40 from Sunsail.

The Regatta’s sponsors, including Host Sponsor Kata Group, Khunying Patama Leeswadtrakul, RMA Group, Ford Motor Company (Thailand), Ricoh (Thailand) Limited, Haad Thip PCL, Pine Pacific Corporation Limited, Singha Corporation Co., Ltd., and National Telecom Public Company Limited.

For more information and result, please visit www.kingscup.com.

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